Is Buono qualified even if she’s not rich and won’t call people “jerks”?

Jersey accent, no sweater vests, nice lady
Jersey accent, no sweater vests, nice lady

Thank you for joining this seminar on what it means to be “qualified” to be  governor of New Jersey.  As you’re probably aware, former Gov. Tom Kean famously says Barbara Buono is a “nice lady” who is “not qualified” to be governor.  So  we should talk about the men and one woman who served as governor in the last 50 years and see what sort of qualifications they had  and compare those qualifications with Sen. Buono’s.

Has The Star-Ledger Gone Crazy? Has Tom Kean?

First, the editorial department publishes an endorsement in which it unethically suggests that voters choose a man it clearly believes is unqualified to hold high office because he is a “fraud” and a “catastrophe.” Now, the same editorial department, just a week later,  publishes a sickeningly  sexist comment by former Gov. Tom Kean in which he pats Barbara Buono on the head and calls her a “nice lady” who is “unqualified” to be governor.

What is Christie hiding in Hunterdon County?

Christie mug shot on the cover of Time
Christie mug shot on the cover of Time

Just as a trial court in Trenton was about to release potentially embarrassing—and possibly explosive—documents about the Christie administration’s involvement in the quashing of indictments against powerful Republican allies, the Appellate Division saved the day for Gov. Chris Christie.  And, maybe, saved the election.

The Star-Ledger wants us to vote for a man it calls a catastrophe and a fraud. No, thanks.

Christie mug shot on the cover of Time
Christie mug shot on the cover of Time

What is extraordinary about  today’s Star-Ledger editorial endorsing Chris Christie  is that it invites readers to follow an immoral—or, at least, amoral—path: To vote for a man its anonymous author points out is “hostile to low income families” by raising their taxes and “sabotaging”  affordable housing. The writer asks us to vote for a man who is a “catastrophe” for the environment and “fraudulent”  in his budget. The newspaper concedes he is destroying our independent judiciary.  New Jersey’s largest daily further asks us to embrace someone who is at least borderline corrupt because he made sure a friend won a no-bid state contract.

A story of betrayal

justices                Betrayal. That’s what it’s called when people or institutions on which we rely turn against us, deliberately or inadvertently.  One story today on the front page of The Star-Ledger illustrates two seamlessly interwoven examples—betrayal by the press, on which we rely for truth, skepticism and independent perspective, and betrayal by members of the judiciary, on which we rely for justice.